May 2019

The parents of Army Specialist Trevor Win’E accept a plaque commemorating the naming of the main post office in Orange to honor their son, killed in Iraq in 2004.  From left, Rep. Lou Correa of the 46th District, Postmaster Mark Logue, Debi and Rick Win’E.  Photo by Tony Richards 

The main post office on Tustin Street in Orange was named to honor Army Specialist Trevor Anthony Win’E, in a somber, yet celebratåory ceremony held April 24.

The City of Orange native, son of Rick and Debi Win’E, was killed by an improvised explosive device in Iraq in 2004. 

Congressman Lou åCorrea (D-CA 46th) was instrumental in passing legislation to place the fallen soldier’s name on the post office.  “We want future generations to remember him for his sacrifice,” Correa said. “We honor not just Trevor, but all of the Orange County soldiers lost in Iraq and Afghanistan.” 

Reminder to remember
Master of Ceremonies Mark Wayland, himself a decorated Marine veteran, stressed that the best gift that can be given to Gold Star families (those who have lost someone in war) is to remember their children’s names.  

“Trevor’s name is going on this post office,” he said, “but he represents all the sons, daughters and loved ones of Gold Star families.”

Trevor Win’E joined the army in May 2002 and trained at Fort Benning, Georgia, to become a petroleum specialist. He was then stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington with the Petroleum Platoon in the 24th Quartermaster Company. Originally assigned to duty in South Korea, he convinced his superiors to allow him to stay with his unit, which was being deployed to Iraq. 

He arrived there in November 2003 and served as a petroleum specialist and gunner. His unit was attacked on April 30, 2004, while he was serving as a gunner on the lead truck of a convoy. He died of his injuries the next day.

And life goes on
“Trevor wouldn’t want his death to ruin life,” his mother Debi says. “He was fun, he was goofy.” His high school counselor recalls that he was eager to go to Iraq and do the job he trained so long to do.

The ceremony, held behind the main post office, was attended by some 200 people, including veterans, Gold and Blue Star (active duty) families, elected officials and community members.  The Calvary Chapel High School band played patriotic music and the national anthem was sung by the Wimberly Bluegrass Band. 

The names of the other 57 Orange County soldiers killed since 9/11 were read one by one by two members of the Orange High School Junior ROTC.

Orange post office named to honor

soldier killed in action