Pool parity

Dear Editor:
The ElMo pool is a community pool that is used by many for sports, activities and events. This pool serves as a meeting place for water polo, swim meets, swim school practices and, believe it or not, a place where students can utilize this space as a project experiment. The ElMo pool is not just a “pool.” For some it is a comfort zone, a second home and a place where they can always feel support and love given by the many athletic events. Many students in physics even come to the pool to test out their work, rowing a boat across the pool. A renovation of the pool will not only help the athletic programs, but it will also help many of the science students.

Unfortunately, with no ElMo pool, students must rearrange their schedules. They have to jump from location to location for practices, without any transportation provided by the district. With the pool being at ElMo, students could comfortably walk “around the corner” to meet for practices and games. However, students have to go to school, go home for a few hours, then meet for practice from 4-7 p.m. 

I understand that the pool is a huge cost for the district, but there can be many solutions to the cost. The aquatic teams can put together fundraisers; they can get sponsors from many willing companies. Sure, ElMo may not need a 51-meter pool, but a 25-meter pool renovation would be gratefully received by the aquatic programs who all share one thing -- the love of being in the water. 

Abby Sheppard
Santiago Canyon College

Overtaxed

Dear Editor:
Our government keeps taxing the people to aid the rich. One example is the Tesla automobile. The federal government gives Tesla about $10,000 for every one sold, thereby subsidizing vehicle ownership for the rich.

California is using tax dollars to fill the pockets of rich developers. Under the guise of “affordable housing,” California is providing funding, grants, subsidized loans and tax credits, hence the proliferation of those ugly four and five-story condos popping up everywhere.

We have traffic issues, infrastructure issues and water shortages and “tax’m” Newsom wants 500,000 homes built every year. The EIRs must be a total lie. 

Tom Foster 
North Tustin

























 

Mea Culpa

Dear Editor:

Nearly 20 years ago, when the Fieldstone project was put forth for the Sully-Miller site, leaders and members of the OPA community leaped at the chance to have a permanent arena, monies for a club house, and an end to the eyesore and disruption of the Sully-Miller operation.  The problem is, they did that in a vacuum, not being educated about the General, OPA Specific, East Orange and Santiago Greenbelt Plans that protect our community.  They looked upon homes at the Sully-Miller site as an inevitability that could be had with a prize attached.   It was a mistake.

It was only through the vision of others who did understand our plans that a terrible misstep was thwarted.  We dodged a fatal bullet; a precedent that likely would have dissolved our equestrian community over time.  Our steadfast adherence to our plans is what saved us at Ridgeline and what will keep us intact for the future.  We have not deterred from those plans in 45 years and it is imperative that we do not deter from them now.

The fact that those who would like to see us forsake our plans keep mentioning the Fieldstone project as proof that we were willing to alter them before, exposes the dangers of a precedent.  We did not follow through with that thought, but somehow even having had the thought makes us compelled in their eyes to accept Milan’s proposal.  It does not.

Please be advised that those who have signed this recognize that we were not fully informed regarding the consequences to our plan, which led to our support of the Fieldstone project.  

That said, we hereby declare that we are committed to the protection of those plans, including the proper implementation of the OPA Specific Plan.


Charlie Leffler, past president
Laura Thomas, past president
Kathy Ashford, past president
Sharon Mulé, engaged citizen
Richard Siebert, past president

March 2019